About The Crater Registry

An international program for assigning and recording geographic features on the Moon.

Your place on the Moon. Forever. And a day.

The only program authorized by the International Lunar Lands Administration that allows members of the public (that’s you!) to name a crater on the Moon in honour of a family member, friend, or other loved one.

In partnership with Luna Society International – the largest advocacy organization for privatized research, exploration and development of the Moon and its resources – we oversee an exclusive program through which you may permanently designate a crater on the Moon to honour someone special in your life.

No matter where you are, the Moon is there. Always.

It’s a scientific fact that you can prove nearly any night of the year: the Moon is always there in the sky, no matter where in the world you might be.

And if you’re in one place (for instance, Wichita, Kansas) and the one you love is light years away in Chantilly, France (for example) and you both look up at the Moon – well, believe it or not, it’s the exact, very same Moon!

No other gift – whether for a birthday, anniversary, or as a memorial to a lost loved one – is as lasting and noteworthy as the permanent designation of a rare and distinctive crater on Earth’s Moon.

Moon Craters and Heart Hands (Image)
I like to think that the Moon is there, even if I am not looking at it.
Albert Einstein
CRATER EINSTEIN (16.60°N 88.65°W)

Yesterday. Today. And for generations to come.

In the years to come, humans will permanently inhabit the Moon. Permanent bases will be built, and we will send scientists and explorers – and, perhaps, even you will visit some day.
But the craters, mountains, valleys and other important geographic features will always be protected from being developed or altered in any way.

That means that the crater that was named for Julius Caesar, Shakespeare, Marie Curie, Albert Einstein, or your third cousin (twice removed) Gwendolyn will remain unchanged through eternity.
(Please note that we cannot be held responsible for any damage, destruction or alterations caused through impacts by meteors, space debris, or forces beyond our control.)

Moon Surface Showing Lunar Craters (Image)